Monthly Archives: May 2015

Right to Try: My Latest Thoughts

So Paul Knoepfler has an excellent article on his take on Right to Try on his blog (find it right here.) I think that it’s balanced in a lot of ways, and yet I do have to say that I think there are more issues that need to be take into account. There’s a piece of advice that I’ve seen floating around the web for quite a while: if you write something online that you feel is significant, make sure that it’s preserved in a more permanent way than on Facebook, as a comment on someone else’s post, etc etc etc. That’s what I’ve done here. 🙂 So… here’s my comment on Paul Knoepfler’s post on Right to Try issues.
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About Me!

Cathy Danielson
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Cathy Danielson

In 2011, my life was shattered when I was diagnosed with a mysterious, incurable disease that always ends in blindness. The only hope on the horizon was a drug that broke all barriers in early testing. This drug, which replaces damaged cells in the eye, comes from the new class of stem cell based treatments that could cure the incurable, providing hope for patients with cancer, heart failure, ALS, cerebral palsy, and many more fatal and disabling diseases.

I survived the disease, and I now have the only remission on record. But a remission is not a cure. The stem cell drug I need for a real cure is now rapidly moving towards approval in the rest of the world, but in the USA, it—and all other cellular therapies-- are still stuck behind prejudice, ignorance, and lack of funding. Hundreds of millions of desperate patients with incurable diseases need these drugs.

That’s why I’ve gone on to fight for greater public education on stem cell drugs, knowing that our laws must be changed so that all of us can get access to the best treatments instead of our health and our lives being held hostage by special interests.

I’m now a patient advocate whose work on stem cells and patients’ rights has been published in outlets such as the Oregonian. I am a manager at popular science and financial blog www.stemcellinvestor.com and a frequent speaker at many venues across the spectrum, including churches, scientific conferences, and atheist groups, and everything in between. I’m also an advocate for Right to Try laws that would allow access to experimental medication for terminal patients at the state level. Read the entire story in my upcoming book, And the Blind Shall See: A Skeptic Patient Surprised by Faith, Science, Family, and Miracle Cures.
Cathy Danielson
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Be sure to check out the Investor Stem Cell Forums here!

More Details About That South Korean Study

Here’s the link for the original South Korean article showing even more positive results for patients when the Ocata technique was used. This is a much smaller study with only four people, and I think the real value is that it supports the original results in the Lancet. There were two AMD and two SMD patients, and when I read the full article, I could see that all of them had improvements. Three were very significant (vision improved 50%, 100% (twice as good, and I can never remember if that should be 100% or 200%), and 1300% improvement– yes, vision that was thirteen times better than before the study!

The fourth person wasn’t considered to have significant improvement, but I’m not so sure that I would agree. Their vision went from being able to read one letter to two, and when your vision is that bad to start with, any improvement helps.

Anyway… I highly recommend reading the whole article. The complete pdf if available for free, which is usually not the case– so take advantage of it!

Treatment of Macular Degeneration Using Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium: Preliminary Results in Asian Patients

New Ocata Press Release!

YES! These are the results we’ve been waiting for from CHA in So. Korea. They are great, and they 100% support the Lancet results from Ocata’s own trials. The thing that really impresses me about the CHA results is that just like Ocata’s, they were published in a peer-reviewed journal instead of being released through a company announcement. I have to say, I’m kind of over company announcements. (Remember when StemCells Inc did that??) Anyone can announce anything. I can announce that I just won Powerball. That doesn’t make it true! An article in a peer-reviewed journal is the gold standard.

Anyway, here’s a snippet, although you really need to go the link:
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